Recover Together

Addiction is treatable

Only 1 in 10 people who need treatment get treatment

Wondering if treatment is right for you?

Addiction is a treatable, chronic brain disease and lifesaving treatments are available. According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), there are multiple evidence-based approaches to treating addiction. Treatment can include behavioral therapy, medications, or a combination of the two. The specific type of treatment will vary depending on someone’s individual needs and the types of substances being used.

NIDA developed a screening tool to help you evaluate and assess a situation on your own. The Tobacco, Alcohol, Prescription medication, and other Substance use (TAPS) Tool consists of a screening component followed by a brief assessment for those who respond positively to the screening questions. The survey will ask you questions about your use of substances, including tobacco, marijuana, and alcohol. The results can be used in discussions with a healthcare provider, to help them make the best recommendations for overall care. You can take this assessment at drugabuse.gov.

Find local support

Many states have services to help find substance use treatment. Select your state from the drop-down box below to learn how to connect to information and resources if you or someone you know is seeking help. National help is also available at findtreatment.samhsa.gov
State

Find Naloxone near you

If you are interested in finding out where you can obtain Naloxone, you can use our locator tool to search for participating pharmacies (CVS, Rite Aid, Walgreens, and Walmart) in your community. Just type an address or landmark location (like home or work) into the search bar below to find convenient locations.

Naloxone can reverse overdose by opioids such as heroin, morphine, and oxycodone. It is promoted by the US Surgeon General as a key life-saving tool in the midst of the US Opioid Epidemic. In Dec 2018, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new guidance recommending that naloxone be co-prescribed to all patients at risk for opioid complications.

Naloxone is available without a prescription in most states and generally available same day. It can very quickly restore normal respiration to a person whose breathing has slowed or stopped as a result of overdosing.